Contraceptive research paper

Male Contraceptives : Limiting male contraception to vasectomies and condoms, as is the case today, is very restrictive. CONRAD has supported investigators who are aggressively researching different compounds that can disrupt sperm production and function, so that safe, effective and inexpensive contraceptives can be offered to men. In collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), CONRAD conducted a clinical trial of a long-acting injectable hormonal contraceptive for men in several countries. The study was halted due to side effects. 

Overall need for publicly funded contraceptive care increased dramatically over the past decade and a half, rising from million women in 2000 to million women in 2014. The extent of the increase has varied across social and demographic groups, largely mirroring demographic changes among all women ( Tables 1, 3 and 4 and Figure 1). The share of all women in need of publicly funded services who were poor adult women rose the most—from 25% ( million out of million) in 2000 to 31% ( million out of million) in 2014.

Geographically, the global contraceptive market has been categorized into five major regions and the key countries in the respective region: North America (the ., Canada), Europe (the ., Germany, Russia, France, Spain, Italy, and Rest of Europe), Asia Pacific (Japan, India, China, Australia & New Zealand and Rest of Asia Pacific), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and Rest of Latin America) and Middle East & Africa (South Africa, GCC countries and Rest of Middle East & Africa). The market size and forecast for each of these regions and the mentioned countries have been provided for the period from 2015 to 2025, along with their respective CAGRs for the forecast period from 2017 to 2025, considering 2016 as the base year. The research study also covers the competitive scenario in these regions.

Study results suggest the one-year ring is effective in preventing pregnancy when used as directed, and that its safety profile is similar to that of other marketed hormonal contraceptives. The ring is also well-accepted by women and their partners. The vast majority of women in the trials reported being satisfied or very satisfied with this novel form of contraception. Roughly 2 ¼ inches in diameter, the ring is soft, flexible, and easily inserted into the vagina by the woman herself—and does not have to be inserted by a trained healthcare provider. It is left in place for 21 days and removed for seven days, for up to 13 cycles. Once in place, the ring prevents ovulation by continuously releasing a low dose of hormones through the vaginal walls and into the bloodstream. The hormones keep an egg from being released from the ovary to prevent fertilization.

Contraceptive research paper

contraceptive research paper

Study results suggest the one-year ring is effective in preventing pregnancy when used as directed, and that its safety profile is similar to that of other marketed hormonal contraceptives. The ring is also well-accepted by women and their partners. The vast majority of women in the trials reported being satisfied or very satisfied with this novel form of contraception. Roughly 2 ¼ inches in diameter, the ring is soft, flexible, and easily inserted into the vagina by the woman herself—and does not have to be inserted by a trained healthcare provider. It is left in place for 21 days and removed for seven days, for up to 13 cycles. Once in place, the ring prevents ovulation by continuously releasing a low dose of hormones through the vaginal walls and into the bloodstream. The hormones keep an egg from being released from the ovary to prevent fertilization.

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