Embryonic stem cell research newspaper articles

The company's team of 36, with 15 nationalities represented, has taken advantage of that milieu. It already owns six stem cell lines made from conventional, noncloned embryos that are approved for . federal funding. Now it is perfecting methods of turning those cells into the kind of pancreatic islet cells that diabetics need, as well as into heart muscle cells that could help heart attack patients. The company is developing new, mouse-free culture systems and sterile production facilities to satisfy regulators such as the . Food and Drug Administration. It hopes to begin clinical tests in humans by 2007.

Eve-Marie's Equine Stem Cells Nutrition show dramatic results. For several horses facing serious physical challenges, cases where the animals might have to be put down, we saw a return to quality of life. This did not happen before Equine Stem Cell Nutrition. Eve-Marie says that this turnaround was quick, less than two weeks in many cases, and that the subject horses were back to health and enjoying pasture life within a month. One of the unofficial trial subjects for the equine stem cell nutrition was a 30-year old donkey who was in bad shape, Eve-Marie reports. He hadchronic respiratory difficulty and could move about only haltingly. His owner had stem cell enhancer supplements to help with her own serious health challenges and shared it with the donkey. The donkey's owner says this is the first time she wasn't sick, and her donkey is walking all around, feeling great an enjoying life again!

Pros and Cons of Stem Cell Research - Embryonic Cells
The pros and cons of stem cell research come to the surface when we examine the third source of stem cells - embryonic cells. Embryonic stem cells are extracted directly from an embryo before the embryo's cells begin to differentiate. At this stage the embryo is referred to as a "blastocyst." There are about 100 cells in a blastocyst, a very large percentage of which are stem cells, which can be kept alive indefinitely, grown in cultures, where the stem cells continue to double in number every 2-3 days. A replicating set of stem cells from a single blastocyst is called a "stem cell line" because the genetic material all comes from the same fertilized human egg that started it. President Bush authorized federal funding for research on the 15 stem cell lines available in August 2001. Other stem cell lines are also available for research but without the coveted assistance of federal funding.

So what is the controversy all about? Those who value human life from the point of conception, oppose embryonic stem cell research because the extraction of stem cells from this type of an embryo requires its destruction. In other words, it requires that a human life be killed. Some believe this to be the same as murder. Against this, embryonic research advocates argue that the tiny blastocyst has no human features. Further, new stem cell lines already exist due to the common practice of in vitro fertilization. Research advocates conclude that many fertilized human cells have already been banked, but are not being made available for research. Advocates of embryonic stem cell research claim new human lives will not be created for the sole purpose of experimentation.

Others argue against such research on medical grounds. Mice treated for Parkinson's with embryonic stem cells have died from brain tumors in as much as 20% of cases. 1 Embryonic stem cells stored over time have been shown to create the type of chromosomal anomalies that create cancer cells. 2 Looking at it from a more pragmatic standpoint, funds devoted to embryonic stem cell research are funds being taken away from the other two more promising and less controversial types of stem cell research mentioned above.

It is important to note that iPSCs and ESCs are not equivalent. They have many similar properties, such as pluripotency and differentiation potential, the expression of pluripotency genes, epigenetic patterns, embryoid body and teratoma formation, and viable chimera formation. [50] [51] However, similar does not mean they are the same. In fact, there are many differences within these properties. Importantly, the chromatin of iPSCs appears to be more "closed" or methylated than that of ESCs. [50] [51] Similarly, the gene expression pattern between ESCs and iPSCs, or even iPSCs sourced from different origins. [50] There are thus questions about the "completeness" of reprogramming and the somatic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells. Despite this, inducing adult cells to be pluripotent appears to be viable.

To evaluate the effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) as a neurosteroid on the rate of neurogenesis, neural survival, and proliferation of pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons, we have added DHEA to mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma cell- and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors (ECC- and ESC-NPs). In ECC-derived NPs, flow cytometric analysis of nestin and Tuj1-positive cells revealed that the percentages of these cells increased significantly for the markers following DHEA treatment of the cells. Moreover, the percentages of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells, the marker of dopaminergic neurons, significantly increased in the presence of DHEA. The expression of neural-specific genes such as Mash1, Pax6, Tuj1, and TH was also detected by RT-PCR analysis. BrdU incorporation and estrogen receptor (EsR) were found to be increased after DHEA induction. Moreover, apoptosis was significantly decreased after DHEA treatment. DHEA effect was also confirmed on human ESC-NPs by the enhancement of Tuj1- and TH-immunofluorescent-positive cells and TH and Nurr1 transcripts, as detected by quantitative RT-PCR. In conclusion, these results have presented evidence that DHEA was able to induce neurogenesis in mouse ECC and human ESC-NPs. This observation was related to the division of NPs and the reduction of apoptosis. Moreover, DHEA has dopaminergic potential in the cells of both orders. This provides a better insight into the differentiation and maintenance of neural cells and treatment of a wide variety of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's by stem cells.

Embryonic stem cell research newspaper articles

embryonic stem cell research newspaper articles

It is important to note that iPSCs and ESCs are not equivalent. They have many similar properties, such as pluripotency and differentiation potential, the expression of pluripotency genes, epigenetic patterns, embryoid body and teratoma formation, and viable chimera formation. [50] [51] However, similar does not mean they are the same. In fact, there are many differences within these properties. Importantly, the chromatin of iPSCs appears to be more "closed" or methylated than that of ESCs. [50] [51] Similarly, the gene expression pattern between ESCs and iPSCs, or even iPSCs sourced from different origins. [50] There are thus questions about the "completeness" of reprogramming and the somatic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells. Despite this, inducing adult cells to be pluripotent appears to be viable.

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